TEXAS WILL NEVER BE A SAFE PLACE UNTIL WE ENSURE EVERY CORNER OF OUR GREAT STATE HAS ACCESS TO CONSISTENT, HIGH-QUALITY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRAINING AND RESOURCES.

The Institute for Coordinated Community Response (ICCR) is a free, year-long training and technical assistance program that is available to teams of three from rural Texas counties—made up of a law enforcement officer, a prosecutor, and a community advocate—from rural Texas counties who are motivated to improve their systemic response to domestic violence.

Throughout the year, teams will work together to identify gaps and strengths in their current systemic response to domestic violence, make recommendations for changes, and lay the foundation for a sustainable Coordinated Community Response (CCR) that will continually work to increase justice for victims and hold offenders accountable.

Apply

The training year begins and ends at the Conference on Crimes Against Women and includes 12 months of:

Webinars

In-person training

ELearning

Networking opportunities

Technical assistance

More than 1 in 3 Texas women will experience abuse from an intimate partner in her lifetime.

Domestic violence takes a staggering toll on our state.

Coordinated Community Responses (CCRs) have been recognized as a best practice in reducing domestic violence since the Violence Against Women Act was enacted over 20 years ago, but many communities continue to struggle with implementing and sustaining this approach. Competing agency missions, turnover, lack of training funds, and increases in requests for services are barriers to effective CCRs in every community, but they are exacerbated in rural areas that have far fewer resources than their urban counterparts.

There is an alarming lack of services available in rural Texas communities, and many victims are falling through the cracks of their community’s criminal, legal, and advocacy response.

1

Twice as many women in rural communities report more frequent and severe violence than their urban counterparts.

2

Rural counties face greater barriers, including but not limited to:

  • Geographic isolation
  • Under-trained and under-resourced practitioners and agencies
  • Difficulty of maintaining confidentiality in communities with virtually no anonymity

3

Only 27% of Texas counties have a family violence shelter. 19 counties have no access at all to services within county lines.

Since May 2018:

33

Virtual and in-person
trainings provided

500

Practitioners reached
across Texas

4

Survivor focus
groups hosted

21

Advocates

14

Law enforcement officers

12

Prosecutors

13

Rural Texas counties

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This is the third installment of the Best Practice Assessment series. Click to read “What is the Best Practice Assessment?” and “Step One: Organize & Prepare”. Once each ICCR team…
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October 1, 2020

BPA Step One: Organize & Prepare

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September 1, 2020

What is the Best Practice Assessment?

The 2020 ICCR training year began in May, and since that time, teams have been taking a deep dive into their community’s systemic response to domestic violence by working through…

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